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  • bottle nursing twins

    I am trying to help someone that will adopt newborn twins domestically at the end of the summer. I googled bottle nursing twins and found nothing. Does anyone have a website or blog with how to do this?

    Any other tips I should suggest?

    Amanda

  • #2
    Hi Amanda.

    I asked this question on another board for mothers of multiples, and was referred to this article. I haven't read it yet, and it seems to revolve more around how to avoid nipple confusion than on mimicking breastfeeding behaviors, but it might be of some help:

    http://www.bfar.org/bottlefeeding.pdf

    Bottlefeeding is also covered fairly thoroughly in "Mothering Multiples", and there are some great tips there for mimicking breastfeeding behaviors while bottlefeeding. She might be able to borrow a copy from her local API or LLL chapter.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would give the normal breastfeeding tips but morph them into bottle nursing tips. Also find good how to's on bottle usage/prep found on a mother multiples sites and keeping track of who was fed when..all the rest is parenting the AP way but nursing through the bottles when they are fed.
      Definatley keep her away from Dr. Phils site and his promo of the hands free feeders :*(
      hth

      Comment


      • #4
        Another response from another list...

        In addition to using a bottle-feeding technique and bottle nipple that allow for more BF-like behaviors, I'd also highly recommend this new mother engage in mother-baby skin contact as much as possible. Skin2skin may be done with two babies at once or one at a time. Not only does skin2skin help each baby stabilize body systems, this contact releases feel-good hormones, e.g. oxytocin and beta-endorphins for all (babies and adults) involved.

        Since this adoptive mother is looking on API for info, would she be interested in supplementing at breast via a Lact-Aid nursing supplementer or SNS? Links to both products are available under Links at my web site (www.karengromada.com). Plus, there are links to recent newspaper articles re: adoptive BF at www.ohiobreastfeedingalliance.org under "Breastfeeding in the News" -- the title is the same for consecutively dated articles; however, the articles are different. Although the articles mention only singletons, I've met a couple of women (has been several years) who BF adopted twins. Many women will bring in some milk and some have brought in quite a
        bit of milk with a history of a previous pregnancy/BF, but adoptive BF is usually about sharing the psychosocial aspects of BF first and the milk second. It is discussed a bit in the 2007 edition of Mothering Multiples re: chapter about Full versus Partial BF.

        K

        Comment


        • #5
          I think that the SNS is a complete pain in the rear - I've tried it with all three of my boys (one due to prematurity and the others due to being slightly preemie twins). I honestly think that anyone adopting twins will have their hands full enough with caring for them to not want to go with SNS or with trying to relactate. This is my opinion, sorry.
          I think having two people around for most/all feedings would be a best case scenario. They should hold the babies in their arms and look at the babies,make eye contact if possible and smile, hum, talk to the babies in quiet reassuring voices, etc. You CAN be a attached parent and bottle feed. Especially in this sort of circumstance. If the adoptive parent must be alone at times then staggering the babies feeding or feeding one while comforting the other (next to mom and able to see/smell her) could work. It is very stressful to feed one baby while the other is hungry avoid this if possible.
          Good luck!Merijo

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by WildBlueberry View Post
            Another response from another list...

            In addition to using a bottle-feeding technique and bottle nipple that allow for more BF-like behaviors, I'd also highly recommend this new mother engage in mother-baby skin contact as much as possible. Skin2skin may be done with two babies at once or one at a time. Not only does skin2skin help each baby stabilize body systems, this contact releases feel-good hormones, e.g. oxytocin and beta-endorphins for all (babies and adults) involved.

            Since this adoptive mother is looking on API for info, would she be interested in supplementing at breast via a Lact-Aid nursing supplementer or SNS? Links to both products are available under Links at my web site (www.karengromada.com). Plus, there are links to recent newspaper articles re: adoptive BF at www.ohiobreastfeedingalliance.org under "Breastfeeding in the News" -- the title is the same for consecutively dated articles; however, the articles are different. Although the articles mention only singletons, I've met a couple of women (has been several years) who BF adopted twins. Many women will bring in some milk and some have brought in quite a
            bit of milk with a history of a previous pregnancy/BF, but adoptive BF is usually about sharing the psychosocial aspects of BF first and the milk second. It is discussed a bit in the 2007 edition of Mothering Multiples re: chapter about Full versus Partial BF.

            K
            I think this is a lovely idea. Even if she uses the SNS just for the first few weeks. The lact-aid though I found easier for laying down while nursing (we used it to supplement due to low supply)


            Originally posted by mama23boys View Post
            I think that the SNS is a complete pain in the rear - I've tried it with all three of my boys (one due to prematurity and the others due to being slightly preemie twins). I honestly think that anyone adopting twins will have their hands full enough with caring for them to not want to go with SNS or with trying to relactate. This is my opinion, sorry.
            I think having two people around for most/all feedings would be a best case scenario. They should hold the babies in their arms and look at the babies,make eye contact if possible and smile, hum, talk to the babies in quiet reassuring voices, etc. You CAN be a attached parent and bottle feed. Especially in this sort of circumstance. If the adoptive parent must be alone at times then staggering the babies feeding or feeding one while comforting the other (next to mom and able to see/smell her) could work. It is very stressful to feed one baby while the other is hungry avoid this if possible.
            Good luck!Merijo

            The SNS can be a PIA your 100% right, it's not the easiest thing while out at the shops. BUT I think around the house it could be used at least part time without being too much trouble.

            And you can be attached while bottle feeding too!

            Comment


            • #7
              No, I think SNS is a pain even at home. I felt that I got more milk on me and on the baby than in the baby. I was "taught" how to use the system by a LC so who knows what it does in someone elses hands. I think we never got a good latch around the tubing. So, while BFing is the ideal I would totally not put a lot of effort into this. I would work on being attached while feeding a bottle. No sense in debating this, the woman will do what is best for her and her family. This is of course just my thoughts on what I would do if we were ever to adopt a baby girl .... maybe someday?
              Merijo

              Comment


              • #8
                Mama23boys

                When you speak of the SNS, are you speaking of the Medela SNS specifically? I am an adoptive Mom who is planning to try the Lact-aid (which I've heard is a lot easier than the SNS by Medela)...just wondering which system you had tried.

                Thanks

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks. very helpful post. I read a few of your other posts and they all helped me.

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