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  • Sensory Intergreation Disorder

    Does anyone know very much about this? C just got diagnosed, she 4 1/2, and I am in the process with insurance to get the occupational visits approved. Any advice would be appreciated.

  • #2
    The go-to manual for SID is called "The Out Of Sync Child". It's a great read. There's also a companion manual called "The Out of Sync Child Has Fun". My biggest advice would be to find an OT who does Sensory Integration Therapy, also known as SI.

    How much info do you need? I'm full of it, but don't want to bore you I teach children w/SID and also have a child with the diagnosis (dx). It's essentially a disorder that does not allow the brain to regulate sensory (sight, sound, taste, touch, smell) information. So loud sounds can trigger emotional reactions, etc. What types of symptoms does your child display?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PaxMamma View Post
      The go-to manual for SID is called "The Out Of Sync Child". It's a great read. There's also a companion manual called "The Out of Sync Child Has Fun". My biggest advice would be to find an OT who does Sensory Integration Therapy, also known as SI.

      How much info do you need? I'm full of it, but don't want to bore you I teach children w/SID and also have a child with the diagnosis (dx). It's essentially a disorder that does not allow the brain to regulate sensory (sight, sound, taste, touch, smell) information. So loud sounds can trigger emotional reactions, etc. What types of symptoms does your child display?
      Thanks so much for any help!

      According to the eval that was done, she has an inabilty to understand where she is and where the ground is, and some auditory/visual issues-she sleeps better when it is silent in the house, and literally rocks herself to sleep. She also has a terrible time with transitions-shes been in her daycare for about three months, and is just now getting more comfortable.

      She is quite exhausting-spitting is the latest and she kicks/hits me, especially around bedtime.

      I am in the process of getting occupational therapy approved by her insurance-she is my foster child, I am her sister doing kinship foster care.

      Any ideas would be great! I will look up those books!

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      • #4
        i'm sorry for not responding to this, but hopefully you've gotten approved for OT by now. have you been able to meet w/him/her yet? many children w/SID experience great progress through Sensory Integration Therapy. if your OT is any good, he/she will help you find activities that you can incorporate at home that will help your sister's nervous system find a calm balance and the behaviors that you are experiencing will either mellow or dissipate altogether. brushing is an easy, effective activity, but you need to be trained by an OT on how to do it. weighted blankets, vests, lap bags are also highly effective.

        on top of SID, you have a little girl experiencing life stressors: new home, new school, loss of previous caregiver, etc. these can be extremely traumatic for any child, but even more intense for a child with a disability. she will need lots of patience, love, and understanding from you.

        let us know what her progress is!

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        • #5
          I worked in child welfare specifically with foster children for many years, and my son also has SID/SPD. I just wanted to mention that your sister/foster daughter could also be displaying some of this behavior as a result of abuse/neglect, so you also may want to pursue therapy with someone specializing in attachment therapy. Attachment therapy is different from attachment parenting and would look at some of her early experiences. The rocking herself to sleep may very well be sensory related (my son does some pretty intense rocking/slamming himself into the couch/bed etc) but given that she must have had some sort of abuse or neglect in her past to be in kinship care with you, I would not want to overlook the psychological and emotional side of this and focus solely on the sensory integration part.

          Addressing the psychological/emotional side of her behaviors as well as the sensory issues are probably really necessary for her, and the OT who evaluated her may not have had enough experience with foster children to have considered this. Rocking oneself to sleep is often a result of early deprivation. It is seen really frequently in children who are neglected in their biological family's home, foster home, or orphanage. She is really at a critical time for some of this to be addressed, so I'd do my best to find a therapist with expertise in early trauma/neglect issues (or whatever other issues there are since I don't know her history). Feel free to pm me if you want help locating resources.

          Paxmamma...I would love your take and more info on SID/SPD!

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          • #6
            Just wanted to add with all of the defiant behavior...I cannot judge the severity of her behaviors not knowing her, but I am guessing you have a pretty good idea of if they are within the realm of typical or not for her age. A therapist could help you with addressing that if it isn't "typical" as well and rule out Reactive Attachment Disorder as a possibility. It is not so uncommon again with children who have experienced deprivation or trauma, and addressing this early would make your life substantially easier long term as well.

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            • #7
              anna, i agree, as i posted above, this situation is layered. trauma on top of disability (or vice versa) complicates the issue and getting to the source is essential. however, there are times, even when straight-up disability is involved, that it's difficult to "diagnose" the cause. for instance, when a child w/SID tantrums, it could be sensory, it could be normal upset behavior. it takes a long time and investment in a child to be a good judge of which it is, and even then, is often impossible to discover. therefore, i'm a huge believer in "treat the whole person", not just the disability, or trauma, or whatever else may be involved. do whatever it takes to help the child feel better, and keep working until you find a solution.

              i'd love to offer more info on SPD, but it would be easier if you had specific ?s. if you do, post them in a separate thread and i'll offer what i can, although, by no means consider myself an expert.

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              • #8
                Paxmama...not looking for any specific advice really...just ideas on good resources, books, etc. if you had any suggestions. Are you an OT?

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                • #9
                  No, i'm a special education teacher, specializing in Autism, Dyspraxia, SID and mother of a child w/SID and other PDD.

                  i have been wholly disappointed in the lack of resources for parents and educators on the topic. i've attended some really tremendous workshops, but the written materials are few and far between. the Out-of-Sync child is about the best around. and i have personally found that applying the principles of AP at home and Montessori education at school/work creates the best outcomes for children.

                  luckily, in the age of the internet, i've been able to gleen a lot from other moms, too. if you google Sensory Integration, Vestibular Systems, Proprioceptive Input, you will learn a great deal. i had a list of cached resources, but strangely can't find them at the moment. i'll keep searching my desktop and come back and post if i find them.
                  Last edited by PaxMamma; 01-19-2010, 02:02 PM.

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