Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Soother woes

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soother woes

    I'm not sure what to make about this. During the night my dd hardly sucks her soother and feeds amazingly off of both breast and never spits up anymore. However during the day while wearing her she is only happy if she has her soother, (I'm going shopping tommorrow for a make your own wrap to add versitility to the star sling that I use). However during the day she feeds very poorly, often only off of one breast, and spits up a TON. Is this because she sucks her soother so much during the day? If i pull it out she instantly wakes up. If I take it away all together she wants to nurse every hour and then it turns in to a snaking session. Is it normal for a baby to fuss a lot in the sling until she settles down to go to sleep (cuddle carry and cradle carry)? Once she's asleep with her soother she'll sleep for and hour or more. I struggle to get her in the sling when she's awake, the only position she's happy in is the forward facing position and she's not suppose to be put that way until she has full head streangth so i watch her head but that takes my hands away from getting anything accomplished. The only other option is to lay her on the floor where she can kick her heart out. So after a quick vent any suggestions on how to fix the feeding/soother issue?

  • #2
    I gently weaned my baby at 3m from the paci (soother). There was just so many things I didn't want to happen regarding it. I didn't want to be frantically searching for it anymore, I didn't want to be picking it off the ground. I wanted him to nurse when hungry and spit up less. He did end up spitting up less partially because at the time I also cutout dairy in my diet.
    Paci use is a personal choice. We did use it a few weeks longer for only in the car. I felt tied down to this all powerful 'thing'. The paci weaning was an adjustment for us both. More work on my part and a bit of frustration on his but I am happy with the result.

    If you feel like you might want to try that, it might remove the whole question! Also have you tried adjusting your diet for sensitivities? That also might be a possibility.

    Comment


    • #3
      my initial thought is that these two things are unrelated. she's probably not spitting up as much at nite, b/c she's nursing laying down. some babies are able to control the flow much better that way. i'd try nursing her during the day while laying down. i had to do that w/ds2 A LOT. also, he was extremely cranking and very difficult to get to sleep in the sling. it was almost as if he had to scream bloody murder before finally drifting off. i just accepted it as his way of getting all of his energy out before being able to rest. so, i bounced, rocked, soothed in the sling until he was all done screaming.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PaxMamma View Post
        my initial thought is that these two things are unrelated. she's probably not spitting up as much at nite, b/c she's nursing laying down. some babies are able to control the flow much better that way. i'd try nursing her during the day while laying down.
        I agree with Pax. Some of the feeding issues I've had have been totally negated by feeding DS lying down. Sometimes, he will refuse the breast for the paci as well. When he does that, its a clue to me usually that I need to find somewhere to lay out, cause he wants to eat that way! It usually works AND is a good way to get him to take a much needed nap. (sometimes for the both of us!) Experiment with different nursing positions as well to see what works best for the both of you! Let us know what works- Im interested as well! Take care~

        Comment


        • #5
          If I remember correctly, your milk supply is at it's highest and has more fat at night. I think Dr. Sears has some catchy little saying like "night feeding is brain feeding". I wondering if that could also be contributing to more enthusiastic feeding at night vs. daytime.

          Comment

          Working...
          X