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  • New Here With Questions

    Hi all,

    This looks like a terrific forum and I look forward to getting to know you all. Let me start by saying I have a 6 year old daughter who I nursed until she was 3 1/2 or so. She was exclusively breastfed till 6 months when we started cereal and other solid food. I did not replace the nursing at this stage, only supplemented it because I nursed her before she ever got solid food. I went back to work when she turned one and she moved right to sippy cups and cow's milk. She would not take breast milk in a sippy cup and she refused bottles and soothers. I co-slept and learned to sleep through her nursing at night so I never lost any sleep. The only problem I ever had was that she over ate because she would comfort nurse and still want regular meals. She essentially got a breast every time she fussed. When her tummy hurt she'd want to nurse more and wouldn't take a soother. So it was sort of a nasty cycle for a while.

    Anyway I'm working on baby #2 now and we're due in January. I'm very excited and looking forward to nursing and co-sleeping another baby. However, circumstances have changed slightly. I will not be able to stay home full-time for a year like I did with my daughter. I will have to go back to work part-time (half days only 2 or 3 days a week) when the new baby is about 2 months old. I'm looking at having to introduce bottles and potentially soothers this time. I will introduce the bottle at around 4 weeks and hopefully we won't have too many issues.

    My main concern is actually around the comfort nursing and soother thing. I don't like soothers, it's a nasty habit I'd rather not develop but I want to be nice to my parents who are babysitting and give them options for calming a fussy baby. Comfort nursing though presented over feeding problems that I would also like to avoid.

    Those of you that comfort nurse, do you have problems with over feeding? If not, how did you strike the balance?

    Those of you who went back to work early, did you introduce soothers or not?

    Sorry this is so long. I follow the attachment parenting theory pretty closely and became a bit of a fanatic about nursing / co-sleeping / baby wearing with my daughter. Circumstances have changed and therefore my methods have to change with them. Any insight all of you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!!

    Laura

  • #2
    Hi Laura. How is Canada? I thought that Canada provided one year of maternity leave? I bet you have some special project you are into, just curious!

    I just want to remind you that EVERY child is different and the chances your second child will nurse like your first is pretty unlikely! That being said, it is nice that you are being proactive and looking for ideas for problems you anticipate before they happen!

    My main concern is actually around the comfort nursing and soother thing. I don't like soothers, it's a nasty habit I'd rather not develop but I want to be nice to my parents who are babysitting and give them options for calming a fussy baby
    Maybe this baby will not like sucking so much?
    Maybe you could use a pacifier just while you are at work?
    maybe this baby will enjoy a swing or his/her fist as a soothing thing?

    Keep that mind open! Congrats on that soon to be here baby!
    to the API forum!

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes Canada does have 1 year maternity leave. In order to qualify you need to work 600 hours (over any number of jobs over any period of time) and stay off of things like unemployment insurance (which uses those hours). So I was laid off in January, used the hours that would have given me maternity leave and have not been able to find work or work enough since I got pregnant (pregnancy tends to be hard on me) to quality for maternity leave. So unfortunately I will not have the maternity leave this time.

      BTW, thank you for the encouragement. Yes I am hoping that this baby is not nearly as needy as my daughter was. I can't imagine trying to raise my daughter without using attachment parenting. She would have been very challenging for a parent wanting to use traditional methods. Can we say sleep deprivation? lol The hospital wouldn't let me co-sleep so I didn't sleep for 2 days because she'd scream every time they put her in the basinette. I swear if I could afford a midwife / doula I would probably home birth just to avoid that.

      Anyway, thanks for your response!!

      Laura

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Minnie000 View Post
        Those of you that comfort nurse, do you have problems with over feeding? If not, how did you strike the balance?
        I never thought about overfeeding. DD still, at 3.5 years, doesn't seem to care whether or not I have milk for her. She hardly slowed down during pregnancy with DS and today told me that she wishes she could just snuggle and nurse all day long! The only time I noticed possible overfeeding was when DS was born and she was nursing every time he did, but even that chunkiness went away. She is not even a very active child. I think it really just depends on the child, and you may very well end up with a comfort nurser who doesn't overeat.

        Comment


        • #5
          What do you mean when you say an "overfeeding" problem?

          Comment


          • #6
            What I meant by over feeding is that she had nursed so much her little tummy was full, so she basically had a tummy ache. But because she wasn't feeling well she wanted to nurse more. It was sort of a bad cycle. I ended up at one point just not letting her nurse because I knew she was too full. She didn't like it, but it was the only way to solve the problem. And of course within 45 minutes or so her tummy didn't feel so bad and she was fine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Maybe you had a little overproduction of milk and/or she had some food sensitivites?
              What you describe could be symptoms of that. Just something to think about with this new one!

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Laura,

                I have an almost-3-year-old who is still nursing and being raised with attachment parenting. I went back to work full-time--80 hours a week--when she was 6 weeks old. She had nothing but my breastmilk until she was 6 months and very little else until she was 1. When she was almost 1, I quit my job and started working a 40 hour/week job and have been doing that since -- and she still nurses quite often. And I am now 4 months pregnant.

                First, I started pumping around 4 weeks postpartum so we'd have plenty of milk in the freezer. She was only away from me one time before I went back to work - she was with her dad for 1 hour and took a bottle at that time, but never again until I went back to work. When I went back, I had barely pumped enough milk to feed her all day that first day, but once I went back, I was able to easily keep up with what she ate and ended up donating hundreds of ounces of milk that we didn't need. She adjusted her milk intake when at home with dad so that she ate a lot less during the day. I believe what kept my supply up was exclusively feeding at the breast when I was home, making sure I pumped at least as much as she ate every day (pumping just before I came home if I needed to), and cosleeping/night nursing on demand. We used a Breastflow bottle, which was awesome. It didn't drip any milk without sucking. My husband used breastfeeding behaviors - nursing only up to 4 oz per side before gently twisting the nipple out of her mouth, burping, then switching sides to give her more milk. She rarely took more than 4 oz per feeding.

                We never used a soother of any kind. He soothed her by holding and bouncing, or in a swing.

                She has always comfort nursed, but overfeeding hasn't been a problem for us.

                I just read a great article published in Canada that compared women who gave birth with a physician in a hospital, a midwife in a hospital, and a midwife at home and it showed the women who gave birth with midwife at home had better outcomes than the other 2 groups. The article implied that midwifery care and homebirths were options under Canada's health plan. Is this not the case?

                Hope this info helps! Feel free to write with more questions if you have them.
                Adrienne

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by AwakenedMama View Post
                  The article implied that midwifery care and homebirths were options under Canada's health plan. Is this not the case?
                  It depends on the province. In some provinces you have to pay out of pocket to use a midwive.

                  Another Canadian,

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Minnie000 View Post
                    Those of you that comfort nurse, do you have problems with over feeding? If not, how did you strike the balance?
                    I find that my little girl (just over 3 months) will comfort nurse until the point of sore tummy, too. When it happens I just unlatch her and rock her... although it seems to be happening less frequently now.

                    Also: hello from Winnipeg!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Minnie000 View Post
                      I swear if I could afford a midwife / doula I would probably home birth just to avoid that
                      Doulas are fee-for-service, but midwives are most definitely covered under MB Health! You can see one for free just as you would see a doctor for pre-natal/birth/postpartum care. Now if any of the midwives have availability in their schedules for another client... well that's a different story!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just an update to my original message. I have now had my baby. He was born on January 31st and weighed a very scale busing 10 pounds 12 ounces. For those that are curious, yes I had him naturally with no pain killer. Labour was very short, less than an hour and I pushed him out in about 5 minutes.
                        As for nursing, I am nursing successfully after a shaky start. He is 3 weeks old now and nursing on demand as I had hoped. As usual I have enough milk for 3 babies. He's not starving, even the nurses in the hospital were shocked by my massive supply. I ended up pumping and bottle/finger feeding him in the hospital, as well as breastfeeding because he was a little lazy when he was born. With the pumps at the hospital I could get a full feed pumped in about 10 minutes so it wasn't a big deal. I pretty much pumped on demand too because it took no time to get enough milk pumped to supplement his very short nursing sessions.
                        Anyway, after 9 days in the hospital due to blood pressure issues on my part (not everything can be perfect) we finally came home. I haven't pumped or given him a bottle since. And true to form like my daughter, he won't take a soother. I do need him to bottle feed though so I can go back to work. I'm planning to try pumping and let dad give him a bottle in the next couple of days.
                        Fortunately he is not overfeeding like my daughter did. I still have a massive milk supply, even more so than I had with my daughter but he seems to be able to handle it so things are going very well at the moment.
                        I'm thinking I should look into donating some milk to some place that can use it. Do any of you know of any organizations that take donated breast milk? I'm in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
                        Anyway, thank you again for all your help/advice/suggestions. I appreciate the support!

                        Laura

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Congratulations!!!

                          Not sure if this is province specific but I heard that they have eliminated the number of hours needed to qualify for mat benefits?? I will look into this further and post again.

                          Good luck and "Hi" from Montreal
                          Last edited by Evsmama; 02-21-2010, 09:07 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Minnie000 View Post
                            I'm thinking I should look into donating some milk to some place that can use it. Do any of you know of any organizations that take donated breast milk?
                            Hi Laura,

                            I donated milk first through the birth center were my daughter was born - I don't remember what company they went through.

                            We moved when DD was 6 months old, and then I joined MilkShare- http://milkshare.birthingforlife.com/ . Through that, I found a local couple with an adopted child who was nursing but needed supplementation, and I adopted directly to them from then until I stopped pumping.

                            HTH!
                            Adrienne

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